Research Article

French Learners’ Opinion About the Effect of Study Abroad Experience on Language Learning

Canan Aydınbek 1 *
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1 Anadolu University, Faculty of Education, French Language Teaching Department, Eskişehir 26470, TURKEY* Corresponding Author
Mediterranean Journal of Social & Behavioral Research, 3(2), June 2019, 25-28, https://doi.org/10.30935/mjosbr/9590
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ABSTRACT

According to the majority of learners and educators, the best way to learn a second language is to live in a country where this language is spoken. To become proficient in a second language, study abroad is admitted as ‘sine qua non’. Several studies demonstrated the positive impact of the study abroad experience. However, they usually measured language gains by test scores. Fewer studies consider the value of learners’ view of their personal and linguistic development during study abroad.
The aim of this study is to enlighten the perceptions of French learners study abroad experience and how a L2 is learned. We used semi-structured interview for collecting data from six students of French Language Teaching Department at Anadolu University. The subjects stayed in France during 2012-2013 academic year, one or two semesters with Erasmus exchange program. Students reported that they have gained fluency and their self-confidence has developed after the experience.

CITATION (APA)

Aydınbek, C. (2019). French Learners’ Opinion About the Effect of Study Abroad Experience on Language Learning. Mediterranean Journal of Social & Behavioral Research, 3(2), 25-28. https://doi.org/10.30935/mjosbr/9590

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